Global Learning London

Mathematical and Scientific

Mathematical, Scientific and Technical

Climate Change
problem solve using real life data including software e.g. comparing CO2 levels for different countries or changes through time;

explore examples of human impact (both positive and negative) on environments, e.g. the negative effects of deforestation;

develop a critical understanding of technology’s impact on daily life and the wider world, and work together to design and building a sustainable solution to a problem, e.g. a flood-proof way to grow food.

Clothes
play an adapted version of The Trading Game to consider how resources are unequally distributed and produce paper
T-shirts instead of rectangles;

compare the prices of fairly traded school uniforms against the cheaper brands, and present their finding through ICT to decision makers in their school and parents;

learn how to repair clothes simply- i.e. sew on buttons, use simple stitches to hem

Energy
Pupils explore examples of human impact (both positive and negative) on the planet, for example, the negative effects of fuel extraction in the Arctic;

Pupils learn safe ways to use electricity and that we need to consume less of it, as with all energy;

Pupils collect, analyse and present data using a range of sources that compare energy statistics or carbon emissions, e.g. investigating what percentage of UK energy is sourced from renewables, number of households living in fuel poverty in the UK

Food
use mathematical vocabulary to explore real life global issues around food, food choices or lack of food, and gather, interpret and present data comparisons that display food choices, e.g. pictograms showing favourite fruits;

learn about habitats and how different animals and plants are adapted to their environment and interdependent e.g. through food chains and webs;

explore examples of human impact (both positive and negative) on environments: e.g. palm oil is a cheap food ingredient but logging of forests destroys orang-utan habitats.

Health
Pupils learn about keeping healthy in science, including the importance of hygiene, dental health and how vaccinations prevent serious illnesses; they learn that access to this is not equal across the world;

Pupils learn about the importance of the relationship between diet and exercise and a healthy lifestyle to maintain health; including learning about the principles of nutrition and healthy eating;

Through using global health statistics e.g. www.gapminder.org they compare and contrast global health statistics.

Millennium Development Goals
Pupils can:
use mathematical vocabulary and data comparison to explore inequality and chart progress of the MDGs;

learn about biodiversity and its importance, recognising relationships in the natural world and identifying, grouping and classifying;

learn about evolution: how animals and plants adapt to suit their environment in different ways;

learn that our use of technology can present opportunities to overcome global challenges such as climate change and poverty but that industries involved in technology themselves can present problems.

Refugee
Be introduced to the visual, musical and creative arts of a variety of cultures represented by your communities and more widely, and use these as inspiration for pupils’ own work using a variety of media;

An in-depth study of the work of a creative artist from a refugee background, eg Mona Hatoum, Carlos Acosta.

Trade
Pupils take part in a simulation Trading Game using shape and measure to consider how resources are unequally distributed globally;

Pupils compare the prices of fairly traded products against non- Fairtrade brands and investigate percentages and ratios when looking at final costs and earnings for producers; they present their finding through ICT to decision makers in their school and parents.

Transport
Pupils use maths to explore the impact (both positive and negative) of transport, for example studying the air miles required in transporting Fairtrade goods from Kenya;
Pupils collect, analyse and present data using a range of sources that compares transport use, eg investigating how pupils travel to school;

Pupils research, develop and design a simple vehicle and peer evaluate against set criteria, eg functionality, use of recycled materials, energy efficiency.

Waste and Recycling
Pupils:
use maths across the curriculum to investigate waste, e.g. time problems on a plastic bag theme: 1 second to make, 20 minutes to use, over 100 years to degrade – they work out equivalents in other units of measurement;

explore examples of human impact (positive and negative) on environments, for example, the negative effects of waste, litter and landfill;

investigate and design their own bags from recycled materials to replace plastic bags

Water
Use mathematical vocabulary and data comparison to explore rainfall, water use or other water-based problem-solving, using units of measurement for liquids (m and ml);

Learn that water can be in a solid, liquid or a gaseous state and that this is reversible, carry out experiments to demonstrate this;

Compare water usage between pupils, classes or with a partner school then jointly decide on action to reduce consumption.

That water can contain germs and microbes and be unsafe to drink;

Plan and carry out a filtration experiment to remove sediment from water.