Global Learning London

Creative

Curriculum planning

Creative

Climate Change
Pupils respond to the issue of climate change through creating their own art as a response to what they have learnt. Visual representations, including photography, can be used to develop their interest and skills, for example through photo journalism i.e. National Geographic;

Pupils develop their own imaginative and creative ways of expressing their commitments to the environment locally, nationally and globally, which can be shared with the school community and more widely.

Clothes
bring in an old item of clothing to be given a design makeover using tie dye, embellishments and fabric pens, any that are too small can be redesigned into bags;

investigate the fabrics, patterns and designs of different cultures e.g. Adinkra

Energy
Linking to the expressive arts, pupils develop their own imaginative and creative ways of expressing some of their own commitments to the environment, helping others locally, nationally and globally.
Food
design, make and cook healthy nutritious foods, from recipes for a variety of occasions, with a range of produce;

investigate menus sourced on a theme, i.e. locally grown or vegetarian recipes, and demonstrate creativity through creating own menus for real or imagined events, such as a wedding banquet or a tea party for parents;

grow and cook foods from their own classrooms or school grounds, or set up a café for role-play.

Health
Pupils design, make and cook healthy and nutritious foods from recipes and for a variety of occasions, with a range of produce, ie locally grown or vegetarian recipes, and demonstrate their creativity through creating own menus for real or imagined events;

Pupils develop their creativity through roleplay areas in school, eg health clinic or hospital, café or sports club.

Millennium Development Goals
Create work individually, in small groups or as a class, for example, creating visual representations of the MDG goals.
Refugee
Pupils use real life data and statistics to investigate the extent of human population movement and compare refugee numbers in hosting nations;

Pupils learn about the contributions of scientists and mathematicians from refugee backgrounds. Include the well-known (eg Albert Einstein) and those making contributions in your local area if possible.

Trade
Within a choice of budgets and ingredients, pupils design, and prepare recipes that represent their personal priorities, considering organic, vegetarian, Fairtrade and other basic food products. Limiting this to a budget makes the decisions even more challenging, and can be linked with maths.
Transport
Pupils develop their own imaginative and creative ways of expressing their commitments to the environment locally, nationally and globally, which can be shared with the school community and more widely.
Waste and Recycling
Pupils investigate musical instruments made from recycled materials and design and make their own;

Linking to the expressive arts, pupils develop their own imaginative and creative ways of expressing some of their own commitments to the environment, helping others locally, nationally and globally.

Water
Create work individually, in small groups or as a class, e.g. creating 2D and 3D visual representations of seas and oceans and how they are habitats for millions of creatures and plants, linked to geography work.

Investigate underwater sculptures of Jason deCaires Taylor or other environmental artists who seek to improve the marine environment.